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Gary Kroll
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Gary Kroll
Gary Kroll
Ultimate Mets Database popularity ranking: 382 of 981 players
Kroll
Gary Melvin Kroll
Born: July 8, 1941 at Culver City, Cal.
Throws: Right Bats: Right
Height: 6.06 Weight: 220

height=70

First Mets game: August 22, 1964
Last Mets game: August 8, 1965





Share your memories of Gary Kroll

HERE IS WHAT OTHER METS FANS HAVE TO SAY:

David Mo
Can anyone explain why the 1965 Mets, headed for a 50-112 season, sent Kroll and his 6-6 record to the minors in mid-season? He must have said the wrong thing to Stengel...or woke Casey up during one of his mid-game naps. Amazin', amazin', amazin

JQ
I seem to remember that he had trouble holding runners on. His move to first was a balk and opposing baserunners could run on him at will. The Mets probably sent him down to work on mechanics.

Mikey T (Biggest Mets fan in Ohio)
I wrote to Gary Kroll and sent him a 1965 Topps card to be autographed. When the return letter came from him, he had included not one but TWO awesome autographed promotional postcards from that year. I collect these cards for my young son who will inherit my huge Mets collection. Cool and classy.

rg
January 15, 2001
Didn't Gary Kroll combine with Gordon Richardson and possibly one other pitcher to throw a spring training no-hitter. As all of us Met fans know this is the one thing that we can't do (except perhaps win an NL MVP award) so we shouldn't let this one slip away from the momory bank.

ned
February 15, 2002
yes! finally someone else that remembers the no-hitter thrown in the spring by kroll and others. don't recall the details, but I do recall reading about it as a kid.

Joe Figliola
December 6, 2002
Again, too young to see him; but old enough to reflect. Despite the demotion, I think he still finished second on the club with wins. Go figure.

Bob P
March 5, 2005
Gary was one of those dominant minor league pitchers. He pitched two no-hitters in the minors and also struck out 309 batters one season. Unfortunately he never made over the hump in the bigs, pitching for four teams in parts of four seasons.

In his final major league appearance on July 12, 1969, he relieved Luis Tiant, who gave up six runs in the first inning to the Tigers. Gary could not stop the bleeding. He gave up five runs in the bottom of the second inning including a home run to Don Wert. The final batter he faced in the majors was Mickey Lolich, and Gary struck him out. Vern Fuller batter for Kroll in the top of the third, and that was the end of Gary's major league career.

Jamey Bumbalo
February 12, 2006
Let's give Bob P. kudos for amazing info on Gary Kroll. Unbelievably arcane info like he provided is what makes this site great. My knowledge of Gary Kroll is limited to his baseball cards, both of which are rare.

Dalkowski110
February 20, 2009
Gary's 309 K's with the Bakersfield Bears in 1960 is second all-time in the California League. (Larry Jackson struck out 351 in 1954.)

Jim Eckert
January 21, 2011
I watched Gary pitch for the Mets on TV. He was a very big man with big hands. He is the only pitcher I can remember ever seeing who looked he was dangling a pea from his fingers as he set to deliver a pitch.

Michael I Trager
June 4, 2012
Let's not forget that Johan Santana pitched the second no-hitter in NY Mets history. Gary Kroll combined with Gordon Richardson in pitching one during spring training in 1965. I wonder what Mr. Kroll or Mr. Richardson's thoughts are regarding their place in Mets history, and what their thoughts are regarding Santana's gem.

Ike Futch
November 20, 2013
I played against Gary Kroll in the 1960 California League. When the games started at the Bakersfield ballpark the sun was setting over the center field fence behind the pitcher. I hit second in our Modesto lineup so my first at bat was when the sun was setting over the pitcher's right shoulder. If a six-foot-six 200-pound righthander wasn't intimidating enough imagine facing Gary with the sun in your eyes.

That was more intimidating than facing 100-mile-per-hour, wild-throwing lefthander Steve Dalkowski who pitched at Stockton that season.

Gary led the league in wins, strikeouts, and era.









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