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Rich Folkers
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Rich Folkers
Rich Folkers
Ultimate Mets Database popularity ranking: 297 of 984 players
Folkers
Richard Nevin Folkers
Born: October 17, 1946 at Waterloo, Iowa
Throws: Left Bats: Left
Height: 6.02 Weight: 180

Rich Folkers was the most popular Ultimate Mets Database daily lookup on December 24, 2008.

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First Mets game: June 10, 1970
Last Mets game: September 3, 1970





Share your memories of Rich Folkers

HERE IS WHAT OTHER METS FANS HAVE TO SAY:

Jim Snedeker
November 19, 2001
My little sister and I, rabid Met fans in the early 70s, always wondered why Rich Folkers never seemed to smile.

Bubba Agbayani
April 3, 2002
I'm a lifelong Met fan, born in 1968, so I never saw Rich's brand of ineptitude. However, I once saw Howie Rose on an airplane, and I asked him who the worst reliever in Met history was (I vote for Tom Martin), and Howie said, "I always had a problem with Rich Folkers". So I looked Rich up, and his 6.52 ERA for 1970 is Martin-esque for sure. However, kudos for his .333 batting average, surpassed by Eric Cammack's 1.000 average.

Shane Berry
September 26, 2002
Say what you want about his statistics in the bigs, but he really KNOWS pitching. Rich was my pitching coach in college and I can honestly say that I have never personally met someone with as much love and knowledge of the game. He is affable and personable and a great man and father. I enjoyed playing for him as my pitching coach more than any other coach I have come into contact with in my "career". Last I heard the St. Louis Cardinals were employing Rich as a minor league pitching coach. He is a true gem of the game. I loved the times when I was struggling on the hill with my control (I am a lefty, too) and Rich would meander out to the mound to meet me with a series of expletives. He is a major part of some of my more vivid baseball memories.

Larry Burns
May 27, 2003
I remember his baseball card---thickest glasses on a major leaguer all time!!!

Big Vin
July 27, 2003
My Dad, trying to explain how difficult it is to make it to the majors used to tell me that even the worse player on the worse major league team is a hell of a good ball player. Somehow I don't think that applies to Rich.

Steve Cooney
January 14, 2005
A saw Rich pitch in the very first major league game I ever went to. He relieved in a game that Jerry Koosman started against the Giants at Shea in late July of 1970. The Mets lost 4-2 while a non-steroid powered Bobby Bonds homered twice. Why I specifically remember Folkers pitching, I really don't know.

Jonathan Stern
January 18, 2005
Well, it's probably hard to forget a face like that. Or the name, for that matter.

Folkers had a couple of good years as a reliever for the Cards, then became a much-used starter for bad Padres teams. I'm no expert, but seven seasons in the bigs, with many innings pitched in most of them, is something I'd be proud of.

According to Baseballlibrary.com, Folkers inspired the following comment from broadcaster Jerry Coleman: "Rich Folkers is throwing up in the bullpen."

RF Mojica
December 17, 2007
I remember seeing Rich Folkers when he first came up with the Mets and thinking, "this guy looks less like a major league player than any other player I've ever seen." I was only about 8 years old at the time, and had only been watching baseball for two years or so, but I still don't think that record has been beat—except maybe by Rick Reuschel, who was a pretty derned good pitcher.

agee_of_aquarius
April 26, 2009
Scholarly appearance. ERA over 6.

Mook
November 30, 2009
Say what you will about Folkers, he lasted seven years in the majors. I recall reading an article about him in the Daily News (or was it the Post?) when he came up. They projected him as a possible starter and made him sound like the next coming of Cy Young.

Kornicus
August 31, 2011
I remember him dropping a pop up intentionally and starting a 1-4-3 double play. It was when I was about 10 and didn't know the infield fly rule and had never seen someone do this. Thought he was a genius at the time.

Barry Teeter
February 21, 2012
I remember growing up and my Dad (Rich's college roomate) telling me crazy stories about he and Rich, and how great of a guy he was. Those glasses! I would just stare at them on his baseball cards.









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