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Dock Ellis
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Dock Ellis
Dock Ellis
Ultimate Mets Database popularity ranking: 267 of 984 players
Ellis
Dock Phillip Ellis
Born: March 11, 1945 at Los Angeles, Cal.
Died: December 19, 2008 at Los Angeles, Cal.
Throws: Right Bats: Both
Height: 6.03 Weight: 205

Dock Ellis was the most popular Ultimate Mets Database daily lookup on December 20, 2008, September 21, 2011, and September 21, 2012.

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First Mets game: June 18, 1979
Last Mets game: September 19, 1979





Share your memories of Dock Ellis

HERE IS WHAT OTHER METS FANS HAVE TO SAY:

Bug E
This isn't really a Dock Ellis Mets memory, but I wonder -- isn't he the guy who supposedly pitched a no- hitter on acid. (Not with the Mets of course, even hallucinogens don't seem able to cause that!) Also, isn't he the guy the Yankees used to send to the Dominican to look for Pascual Perez when he was AWOL for spring training?

Mr. Sparkle
December 21, 2000
Another pitcher in a long line of guys who had a pretty good career only to come to the Mets very near the end to stink up the joint. Others- Mickey Lolich, Dick Tidrow, Mike Torrez, Warren Spahn,Frank Tanana, Orel Hersheiser (he was OK).

Logan Swanson
April 15, 2001
The real shock isn't that Doc was on acid: it's that while on acid, he and the Pirates took the Eastern Division over the Mets in 1970, '72, '74, and '75. Maybe they should have passed some of that stuff around to Harry Parker and Randy Tate.

Joe Figliola
March 7, 2003
Compared to Dock Ellis and the electric Kool-aid acid test of a no-hitter he threw, David Wells was a mere tee-totaller when he hurled that perfecto in the late 1990s.

The only eyebrow-raiser about Dock's Met tenure was that Topps issued a baseball card of him as a Met in 1980, even though he was off the team by mid-September, 1979. (I think the same thing happened with Ralph Garr, who was listed as a White Sox even though he had left the club for another team after 9-1-1979.) Go figure that!

kevin Sims
June 1, 2003
Hey Doc While you played Baseball you were great, but the greatness I remember of you was when you helped me along with my substance abuse problem. If you read this please contact me. Thanks

Kenny M
September 13, 2003
When Ellis first was acquired by the Mets during the down years I thought it was an interesting acquisition as he was a name player...but he was way past his prime just like those other pitchers that the Mets carried who always seemed to disappoint like Falcone, Hassler, R. Jones, etc. The biggest memory I have of Dock as a Met was his name was sewn on his uniform back above his number (35?) was completely off center way to the left. Not even close. It looked ridiculous and I don't recall it ever being corrected. Whoever sewed it on in the clubhouse must have been in a huge hurry!

Kiwiwriter
July 5, 2004
He was one of baseball's more colorful characters.

I remember him coming on in the 17th inning of one of the Mets' many sea-serpent games, this one against the Pirates, and winning it. My brother lay down on three seats to relax and watch the game (that shows you how bad 1979 attendance was).

The Mets have played an awful lot of sea-serpents (my name for extra inning games).

Jonathan Stern
July 8, 2005
Dock Ellis once went onto the field wearing haircurlers. It was the 70's...

Mike
March 9, 2007
The only memory I have of Dock Ellis as a Met was when he spoke to CBS News after the death of Thurman Munson (the Yankees were on the road, so CBS went to Shea for fan reaction) Ellis spoke of when he and Munson were teammates with the Yanks.

I have that news clip.

Mets fan in Maine
December 22, 2008
This colorful man died the other day (Dec. 20). Even though he spent a fair amount of time with the Yankees, A's, Rangers, and Mets, I always thought of him as a Pirate. The obituaries I read made it sound like he did a lot of good for people with substance problems after he left baseball.

scott r
December 22, 2008
Only memories of Dock were as one of the many former decent pitchers the Mets had in the late 70's early 80's that stunk with Mets and also, according to him he threw a no hitter while on LSD. Sorry to hear about his passing. R.I.P. DOCK

Feat Fan
January 4, 2009
Very sad news, Dock was portrayed as a difficult, moody, controversial druggie but I have heard of a different side. What was made aware to me was a kind, generous and thoughtful spirit who appreciated a new lease on life and worked diligently to help others.

Ellis was a very good pitcher, a tough competitor who had success against the likes of Mays, Aaron, Santo, Williams, McCovey, Bench, Rose, and Brock. (Not too shabby.) I'm sure that there are many in the LA area mourning his passing and thanking him daily for a love that was freely given by him one day at a time.

Mook
December 23, 2009
Ah yes the LSD no-hitter... For a real laugh, go to YouTube and search Doc Ellis and LSD no-hitter. Watch the cartoon from "no mas." It is hilarious.

Metsmind
December 13, 2010
Who can forget the hair curlers? Ignore the druggie and trouble maker reputation, Dock Ellis was a fine pitcher and even better competitor. There is a story of him announcing he would end the Big Red machines intimidation of his Bucs, and then starting the game by hitting the first 3 Reds batters (Rose, Morgan, Driessen) and walking Perez only after Perez ducked the pitches aimed at him. Bench got lucky....the manager pulled Ellis after those 4 batters. At a time of social turmoil, he stood up and let the world know he was a black man to be taken seriously. To that end, he along with Vida Blue, became the first black pitchers to start the same All Star game. RIP Dock.

tony bracci
August 14, 2011
Read an account of Ellis in "Field of Screams" (I think that was where I read it) that goes like this: Ellis had given up a monster homer to Reggie Jackson in the 1971 All-Star game in Detroit and Jackson had hot-dogged it a bit rounding the bases. Fast-forward to 1976...Ellis is on the Yankees and Jackson on the Orioles. A pitch gets away from Ellis and hits Jackson in the face, breaking his glasses and dropping him to his knees. Ellis remarks, "That's what he gets for homering off me in the All-Star game". After the game Ellis finds several $100 bills in his locker from his teammates who also disliked Jackson!

Another story circulated about Ellis is how he nicknamed fellow Pirate teammate Bob Robertson, "The Great White Hope". If I recall correctly, Robertson had a tough day at the plate during a Pirate loss, and felt the clubhouse mood afterward to be a little too jovial. He and Ellis got into an argument and Robertson punched him out. Afterward Ellis called him "The Great White Hope".

Shickhaus Franks
January 10, 2014
Had a brief acting career after his baseball career ended. He played Luke in the 1986 auto factory comedy movie "Gung Ho" starring Pittsburgh native Michael Keaton and it was directed by Ron Howard aka "Opie Taylor"/"Richie Cunningham".









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